Mission & FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions)

The goal of this website is to develop resources (mostly indexes) for genealogists doing research on Polish ancestors here and abroad. Genealogical societies, sadly, often do not provide the vision and leadership to initiate and sustain projects of this nature. Ideally, the resources of this site will include records of Polonia nationwide.

Diocese of Winona, MN

The Diocese of Winona, MN was formed in 1889 and consists of Winona, Wabasha, Olmsted, Dodge, Steele, Waseca, Blue Earth, Watonwan, Cottonwood, Murray, Pipestone, Rock, Nobles, Jackon, Faribault, Martin, Freeborn, Mower, Fillmore, and Houston Counties in Minnesota. The map provided plots the locations of the two Polish Roman Catholic Churches in this diocese.

Diocese of St. Cloud, MN

The Diocese of St. Cloud, MN was formed in 1889 and consists of Stearns, Sherburne, Benton, Morrison, Mille Lacs, Kanabec, Isanti, Pope, Stevens, Traverse, Grant, Douglas, Wilkin, Otter Tail, Todd, and Wadena Counties in Minnesota. The map provided plots the locations of the Polish Roman Catholic Churches in this diocese.

Diocese of Duluth, MN

The Diocese of Duluth, MN was formed in 1889 and consists of Aitkin, Carlton, Cass, Cook, Crow Wing, Itasca, Koochiching, Lake, Pine, and St. Louis Counties in Minnesota. The map provided plots the locations of the Polish Roman Catholic Churches in this diocese.

Diocese of New Ulm, MN

The Diocese of New Ulm, MN was formed in 1957 and consists of Big Stone, Brown, Chippewa, Kandiyohi, Lac Qui Parle, Lincoln, Lyon, McLeon, Meeker, Nicollet, Redwood, Renville, Sibley, Swift, and Yellow Medicine Counties in Minnesota. The map provided plots the locations of the two Polish Roman Catholic Churches in this diocese.

Florian, MN

Florian, MN is the only Polish parish that I found in the Diocese of Crookston, MN.

Fun Facts

The five US counties with the highest numbers of people with Polish ancestry were: 1 Cook (Chicago), IL, 2 New York, NY, 3 Wayne (Detroit), MI, 4 Erie (Buffalo), NY and 5 Milwaukee, WI. This isn't particularly surprising since these are areas in the industrialized north. Many immigrants found work in these cities. Now let's look at counties with the highest percentage of people with Polish ancestry: 1 Sherman (Loup City), NE, 2 Portage (Stevens Point), WI, 3 Nance (Fullerton), NE, 4 Presque Isle (Rogers City), MI and 5 Luzerne (Wilkes-Barre), PA .

Enhanced Search Options for Subscribers

In addition to seeing the content of all the fields (if the record provided that information), subscribers have had some additional search options besides the wildcard options that everyone is free to use. Generally the default options along with usage of wildcard characters is all that's needed. But some options available only to subscribers have been added and are the subjects of this article. At the bottom of each search form, there are three options, Normal, Soundex, and Look-alike.

Coding Names by How They Look

As someone who reads A LOT of handwritten documents, I am aware of some of the common areas of confusion that can arise in transcribing names. But even though I am aware of them does not make me immune to interpreting the letters incorrectly! It's still incredibly hard. In a previous article, Coding by Sound, I summarized how names can be coded by how they sound. This is a valuable tool since names can often be spelled multiple ways and still sound the same.

Making Database Corrections

Despite our best efforts, online databases contain errors! Most databases I have seen do not provide a mechanism for correcting them. Perhaps it's too complicated to do or someone may have a misguided notion that their entry is authoritative. In the latter case, preserving an error often makes the record inaccessible to all except possibly the most shrewd of researchers. Subscribers to this site have a mechanism for correcting substantive errors in most of the databases on this site.

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