Mission & FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions)

The goal of this website is to develop resources (mostly indexes) for genealogists doing research on Polish ancestors here and abroad. Genealogical societies, sadly, often do not provide the vision and leadership to initiate and sustain projects of this nature. Ideally, the resources of this site will include records of Polonia nationwide.

Are you a PGSA member?

I have been a PGSA member since 1983 and have served the Society in many capacities over the years. I served on the Board at various times, but I also sat out many terms to give "new blood" with new ideas and leadership a chance to serve. I think it's time to get an infusion of "new blood" starting in 2017 with the election of a new Board. There has been a lack of transparency in the actions of the current Board if not outright violations of the Society's By-Laws.

St. Boniface, Chicago, IL

Polish immigrants from the German occupied regions of Poland were arriving in Chicago in greater numbers during the 1860s. Some of them joined the German parish of St. Boniface because the Poles had no church of their own in 1865. St. Boniface was founded in 1865 in the West Town neighborhood of Chicago. The Polish parish of St. Stanislaus Kostka was founded in 1869 and most of the Poles became members there. The indexed portion of St. Boniface records includes only the years of 1865-1870 when the Poles were more likely included.

Dziennik Związkowy Death Notice Index 1930-1949

This online index is a compilation of death notices appearing in the Dziennik Związkowy, one of Chicago's Polish daily newspapers, for the years 1930-1949. It is similar to the Dziennik Chicagoski death notice index. The index was compiled by James J. Czuchra.

Diocese of Winona, MN

The Diocese of Winona, MN was formed in 1889 and consists of Winona, Wabasha, Olmsted, Dodge, Steele, Waseca, Blue Earth, Watonwan, Cottonwood, Murray, Pipestone, Rock, Nobles, Jackon, Faribault, Martin, Freeborn, Mower, Fillmore, and Houston Counties in Minnesota. The map provided plots the locations of the two Polish Roman Catholic Churches in this diocese.

Diocese of St. Cloud, MN

The Diocese of St. Cloud, MN was formed in 1889 and consists of Stearns, Sherburne, Benton, Morrison, Mille Lacs, Kanabec, Isanti, Pope, Stevens, Traverse, Grant, Douglas, Wilkin, Otter Tail, Todd, and Wadena Counties in Minnesota. The map provided plots the locations of the Polish Roman Catholic Churches in this diocese.

Diocese of Duluth, MN

The Diocese of Duluth, MN was formed in 1889 and consists of Aitkin, Carlton, Cass, Cook, Crow Wing, Itasca, Koochiching, Lake, Pine, and St. Louis Counties in Minnesota. The map provided plots the locations of the Polish Roman Catholic Churches in this diocese.

Diocese of New Ulm, MN

The Diocese of New Ulm, MN was formed in 1957 and consists of Big Stone, Brown, Chippewa, Kandiyohi, Lac Qui Parle, Lincoln, Lyon, McLeon, Meeker, Nicollet, Redwood, Renville, Sibley, Swift, and Yellow Medicine Counties in Minnesota. The map provided plots the locations of the two Polish Roman Catholic Churches in this diocese.

Florian, MN

Florian, MN is the only Polish parish that I found in the Diocese of Crookston, MN.

Fun Facts

The five US counties with the highest numbers of people with Polish ancestry were: 1 Cook (Chicago), IL, 2 New York, NY, 3 Wayne (Detroit), MI, 4 Erie (Buffalo), NY and 5 Milwaukee, WI. This isn't particularly surprising since these are areas in the industrialized north. Many immigrants found work in these cities. Now let's look at counties with the highest percentage of people with Polish ancestry: 1 Sherman (Loup City), NE, 2 Portage (Stevens Point), WI, 3 Nance (Fullerton), NE, 4 Presque Isle (Rogers City), MI and 5 Luzerne (Wilkes-Barre), PA .

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